Intelligent Design By Any Other Name Is Still Intelligent Design

No one seriously thinks Brian Greene — he of multiverse fame — is an intelligent design proponent. I’m fairly certain he doesn’t see himself as one. Yet he is speculating on the possibility of scientists being able to create their own universes . . . so maybe he should be called something like a proponent of intentional formation of natural universes theory. Regardless, NPR’s All Things Considered recently had a story on all the speculation about this: One day (far off, no doubt), it may be possible to go into a laboratory on Earth, create a “seed” — a device that could grow into a universe — and then there would have to be a way to get that seed, Read More ›

Darwinist Groups Stumbling Over Academic Freedom in Ouachita

As we recently reported, the Ouachita Parish School Board in Monroe, Louisiana, has passed a policy protecting Academic Freedom to Teach Scientific Evidence Regarding Controversial Scientific Subjects. The policy observes that “some teachers may be unsure of the district’s expectations concerning how they should present information on such subjects” and guarantees teachers the academic freedom to teach both scientific strengths and weaknesses of controversial scientific subjects: Toward this end, teachers shall be permitted to help students understand, analyze, critique, and review in an objective manner the scientific strengths and weaknesses of existing scientific theories pertinent to the course being taught. What could be less objectionable? Indeed, according to an article in the News Star in Monroe, Louisiana, a local attorney Read More ›

Mark Farmer’s Evolving Explanations

Mark Farmer has responded to Larry Caldwell’s original post about Farmer’s e-mails to Quality Science Education for All. Readers can decide for themselves whether Farmer’s explanation of what he wrote fits the tone of his original e-mails to Caldwell where Caldwell reported that Farmer enthusiastically asked: “Specifically I would like to know whether or not you support the word of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ being taught in our public schools. This is an issue I feel very strongly about and would need to know your position before making a decision to financially support QSEA.” Caldwell responded saying: Thank you for posting Mark Farmer’s response to my blog post. Farmer’s response is full of contradictions that might be amusing Read More ›

Language of Ouachita Parish’s New Academic Freedom Policy

As noted here, Ouachita Parish around Monroe, Louisiana recently passed a policy on academic freedom for teaching controversial scientific subjects. Here is the text of Ouachita Parish’s new resolution on academic freedom as well as their new their curricular policy: From http://www.opsb.net/downloads/forms/Ouachita_Parish_Science_Curriculum_Policy.pdf Ouachita Parish Science Curriculum Policy Adopted November 29, 2006 RESOLUTION ON TEACHER ACADEMIC FREEDOM TO TEACH SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE REGARDING CONTROVERSIAL SCIENTIFIC SUBJECTS: WHEREAS, the Louisiana Constitution declares that among the legitimate ends of government is “to promote the …education … of the people….” (1), and; WHEREAS, Congress in 2001 declared that “Where topics are taught that may generate controversy (such as biological evolution), the curriculum should help students to understand the full range of scientific views that exist, Read More ›

Local Louisiana School Board Praised for Adopting Policy to Protect Teachers

Monroe, LA — The Ouachita Parish School Board in Louisiana drew praise this week for adopting a Resolution on Teacher Academic Freedom to Teach Scientific Evidence Regarding Controversial Scientific Subjects. The policy states in part that “teachers shall be permitted to help students understand, analyze, critique and review in an objective manner the scientific strengths and weaknesses of existing scientific theories pertinent to the course being taught.” “We’re very happy to see them take a stand protecting the academic freedom of teachers to answer student questions and discuss scientific issues in the classroom,” said Casey Luskin, an attorney and education policy specialist with Discovery Institute’s Center for Science and Culture. “Teachers are the real winners in this case because they Read More ›