Billions of Missing Links: Wombat Pouches

Geoffrey Simmons

Note: This is the third in a series of posts excerpted from my book, Billions of Missing Links: A Rational Look at the Mysteries Evolution Can’t Explain.
A design must be considered improbable if it is highly functional and durable yet too complex to have come about spontaneously or by intermediate steps. Think of the subway system in any large metropolitan area. Could the combination of tracks, stations, tunnels, signs, vending machines, stairwells, lighting, trains, billboards, ticket booths, turnstiles, benches, platforms, security measures, and restrooms have happened all at once or did it come about by stages? If these commuter systems were to follow the tenets of the theory of evolution, the tracks going off in every direction might be called links to the stations called species. How does one get from station to station without the tunnel, train, and tracks? In the theory of evolution, these kinds of intermediaries are abundantly missing.
The wombat has an upside-down pouch. Scientists presume, and it makes sense, that position prevents dirt from entering the pouch when the wombat is digging in the ground. Could there have been transitional species with pouches situated sideways, or did the first wombats have to scoop dirt out of their pouches every day?
Taken from: Billions of Missing Links (Harvest House Publishers, 2007)

Geoffrey Simmons

Fellow, Center for Science and Culture
Geoffrey Simmons (BS in biology, coursework completed for MS in microbiology, University of Illinois; M.D., University of Illinois Medical School; Internship and Residency in Internal Medicine, LAC-USC Medical Center; Boarded in Internal Medicine since 1974) is a licensed and practicing physician in Eugene, OR, as well as an author and lecturer. President of the American Academy of Disaster Medicine and a member of the Board of Governors of the Sacred Heart Medical Center's Emergency Preparedness Committee, he is the author of six novels and of the books What Darwin Didn't Know (Harvest Publishers, 2004) and Billions of Missing Links (Harvest Publishers, 2007). He has lectured on disaster preparedness on radio and television as well as at many neighborhood associations and high schools, and has been a medical correspondent for KABC in Los Angeles and KUGN in Eugene, a guest on the Steve Allen show, and has made numerous radio appearances related to his writings.

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