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Virology Keeps Evolving

Michael Egnor

The science behind the COVID-19 lockdown is evolving again. A headline at PJ Media over the weekend attests:

Mayor [Jacob] Frey Gives Masks to Rioters But Says Opening Churches Would Be a “Public Health Disaster”

That’s from Minneapolis, scene of “the most shocking display of nihilism and anarchy in an American city since the draft riots in New York during the Civil War. But by gum, if you’re going to burn [Mayor Frey’s] city down, you damn well better be wearing a mask.” 

It turns out that COVID-19 spreads less readily when rioting than when worshiping! Even more remarkable, to judge from how elected leaders are responding, it seems that the infectiousness of coronavirus varies with the ideological content of the protest. Virology, in other words, is situational.

Never forget the government lockdown is fundamentally a political act. Government actions may be informed to a greater or lesser degree by science. Lesser seems to be the current trend. 

Photo credit: Lorie Shaull, Minneapolis, Minnesota on May 28, 2020, via Wikimedia Commons.

Michael Egnor

Senior Fellow, Center for Natural & Artificial Intelligence
Michael R. Egnor, MD, is a Professor of Neurosurgery and Pediatrics at State University of New York, Stony Brook, has served as the Director of Pediatric Neurosurgery, and award-winning brain surgeon. He was named one of New York’s best doctors by the New York Magazine in 2005. He received his medical education at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and completed his residency at Jackson Memorial Hospital. His research on hydrocephalus has been published in journals including Journal of Neurosurgery, Pediatrics, and Cerebrospinal Fluid Research. He is on the Scientific Advisory Board of the Hydrocephalus Association in the United States and has lectured extensively throughout the United States and Europe.

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coronavirusCOVID-19draft riotsinfectiousnessJacob FreylockdownmasksmedicineMinneapolisNew York CityPJ Mediariotsvirology